Browse Abstracts (41 total)

| by Best, Carl

Chef Jacob is known for his happy peach pie. Read the ingredients of his pie recipe and the baking rules that he learns from Chef Monty on television. Lots of sounds comes out of Chef Jacob's kitchen. By the end, Chef Jacob says: "P is for Pie and P is for Peach, and, of course, P is for Parents! Happy Anniversary, Mom and Dad". Have fun celebrating this event with the whole family.

| by Blumenthal, Deborah

As Sophie walks home from the park with her mother, she sees another little girl eating a chocolate-covered-cookie. Sophie's mother does not have any cookies to give her and will not allow Sophie to eat cookies so close to supper time. Sophie is outraged and throws a temper tantrum! Sophie learns that not eating a cookie before supper isn't so bad after all.

| by Baylor, Byrd

A young girl feels that her family is so poor that rich people wouldn't even sit at her family's table. She holds a meeting with her family to discuss the money her family has. During the meeting she discovers how rich her family really is. She also learns the important things in life such as, family is more valuable than money itself.

| by Barton, Byron

Sam describes his car, its parts, and how he cares for it. He also discusses where he goes in his car and his job working as a bus driver.

| by Stanbridge, Bobette

Cheerful bird has many nature-filled adventures with her tree friends and rock friends. Also meet Miss Annie Elephant who changes colors with her mood, and Selina Butterfly who changes patterns.

| by Swanson, Diana

When bickering princes take the throne, the kingdom is split in two by a wall so that each brother rules half. The kingdom is divided and it is illegal for people to cross the wall. Since Tamala and Abalon are forbidden to see their grandmother and cousin on the other side of the wall, they decide to float over it in a hot air balloon. They work with their parents to collect materials, build the balloon, and wait for the perfect weather conditions. The family departs during the night, escapes military fire from soldiers, and surprises their relatives in the morning. This adventure is…

| by Cooper, Ilene

A boy and his grandfather are standing on a city sidewalk when they see a billboard starting Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. The boy asks his grandpa what it says and the grandpa reads it and explains the Golden Rule. The boy is intrigued by the rule and starts asking questions. The grandpa explains that each religion has their own version of the Golden Rule. They discuss what the world would be like if everyone followed the Golden Rule. The boy starts to understand the Golden Rule and the grandpa reminds him that the Golden Rule starts with one person: You. It beings with…

| by Cordell, Matthew

Ruben is a troublesome piglet. his grandma gives him a piece of gum to keep him quiet. His mom gives him three rules, but each time she leaves, Ruben breaks a rule and gets into trouble. He finally stops, but then they find Julius, his younger brother, making an even bigger mess!

| by Demi

The author's interpretation of Genghis Khan's life is based upon both historical resources and Mongolian folklore.

| by Halliman, P. K.

Kids like to play as a team no matter what they do -- football, soccer, baseball and all kinds of sports. When they're done playing, it doesn't matter who wins or loses as long as they all had a great time while they were playing. Join these kids in their fun-filled day of teamwork.

| by Arnold, Ted

Walter always wanted to jump on his bed. One night he dreamed that he fell through the floor. When he awoke, he never wanted to jump on his bed again.

| by Chlad, Dorothy

Darryl lives in a place where it snows a lot in the winter. He describes some of the activities he does with his friends and family like building a snowman, making snow angels, shoveling the sidewalk, sledding, and ice skating. In order to enjoy these activities, safety rules need to be observed, so Darryl gives five basic rules to follow.

| by Woodson, Jacqueline

A fence not only divides two properties -- it segregates two families because of their different cultures. Initial fears from the parents cause them to set rules that will forbid the friendship of their young daughters. Little did they know that their daughters would break the barrier as they climbed the fence together to see the world as it should be, not as it is.

| by Shannon, David

The author recalls a book he wrote as a child consisting of the words no and David, and several pictures of things he was not supposed to do. David remakes the idea of a mother telling her son no, but ends with a happier picture and more caring words, including the word yes.

| by Kroll, Virginia

Kimiko is a young Japanese girl who desperately wants a carp kite to fly on Children's Day. But only boys are allowed to have these kites, and Kimiko questions this rule.

| by Pendziwol, Jean//Gourbault, Martine

A little girl meets a friendly dragon at the beach and invites him to tea and lunch. During lunch the dragon sneezes fire and the table and curtains catch on fire. The fire alarm goes off but the little girl knows the important rules of fire safety. She tells the dragon that they must not stay inside and must meet their mother outside by the tree. When the dragon tries to go back in for his teddy bear, the little girl tells him to never to go back insidde a burning building. The little girls mother calls for help and the fire men come and put out the fire. Everyone is safe which is really…

| by Morrison, Toni//Morrison, Slade

Patty, Mickey, and Liza Sue just can't handle their freedom. The things they do frighten the adults around them. The adults decide to put them in a big brown box because they care about the youngsters. The children will have everything they need, except their freedom. Isn't that the one thing children need?

| by Baker, Barbara

Digby and Kate spend every day together. They play games, eat, draw pictures, take walks, and just enjoy each other's company. The only problem is that they often disagree, as a dog and cat should. Still they have fun together and continue to be best friends.

| by Chall, Marsha Wilson

Jean Claude is going to boarding school, but no dogs are allowed at La School d'Excellence. Poor Bonaparte must find a way to be with Jean Claude!

| by Maclear, Kyo

Spork feels left out. He has a spoon and a fork for parents, which makes him unique compared to the other cutlery. He is never chosen in the kitchen, until something comes along that neither forks nor spoons can handle. His uniqueness comes in handy!
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