Browse Abstracts (29 total)

| by Arnold, Katya

Comparisons are made between human students and elephants who are learning how to paint. Photographs of elephants and their artwork are shared. Children learn that these elephants have many similarities to humans and must take part in the same learning process as them in order to achieve goals.

| by DeBear, Kristen

Marina and Moira are very much alike, and yet very different. They like to play with one another, but often have conflicts. They learn to work through their differences and become the best of friends.

| by Hudson, Wade

Tyrone Rashon Williams goes to school on the first day, excited about his new sneakers that he bought himself. He is disappointed when he gets there and finds that everyone has the same ones, and there is a new student, Tyrone Rashon Williams. Tyrone must deal with both of his problems, and get things back to normal.

| by Chaconas, Dori

Cork and Fuzz are best friends, but there's one problem, and it's not that one is an opossum and the other is a muskrat. The problem is that Cork is older than Fuzz, but shorter than him. Bothered by this difference, the pair try to make Fuzz shrink and Cork grow. Fortunately, they realize that friendship is more important than a difference in height.

| by Cannon, Janell

After being separated from Mother Bat, Stellaluna falls into a nest of baby birds. The family of birds adopt Stellaluna as one of their own, while Stellaluna does her best to eat bugs without making faces, sleep during the night, and stop hanging upside down. In the end, Stellaluna rejoins her mother.

| by Hall, Donald

A dog and cat compare and contrast their lives. Each likes and dislikes its own things.

| by Reiser, Lynn

Ruby and Beryl are best friends. They spend an afternoon in the park using their imaginations, proving that best friends really do think alike.

| by Yezerski, Thomas

Keara and Stefan are from Ireland and Poland, respectively, and each tell the stories of their families. They meet in the United States in Pinecone Patch, PA. They overcome deep stereotypes and prejudices to be married and bring two families together.

| by Rotner, Shelley

Take a look at mothers and the many ways they are involved in their children's lives. They teach you, play with you, protect you, and love you.

| by Woodson, Jacqueline

A fence not only divides two properties -- it segregates two families because of their different cultures. Initial fears from the parents cause them to set rules that will forbid the friendship of their young daughters. Little did they know that their daughters would break the barrier as they climbed the fence together to see the world as it should be, not as it is.

| by Hoose, Phillip//Hoose, Hannah

While playing with his friends one day, a little boy spies an ant. As he prepares to squash the tiny insect, the boy listens to the ant's plea not to step on him.

| by Anno, Mitsumasa

Daily activities in a countryside village are shown through the numbers 0 through 12

| by Munsch, Robert

One day Stephanie shows up at school with her hair in a ponytail. At first all of her friends make fun of her, but she quickly becomes a trend-setter. When Stephanie tricks everyone into shaving their heads, they aren't very happy with her.

| by Adelson, Leone

How do animals get ready for winter?Is it different from how children get ready for winter?

| by Stevenson, James

When Warren comes for a brief visit, he acts like his great-uncle and proves even more difficult to get along with.

| by Maclear, Kyo

Spork feels left out. He has a spoon and a fork for parents, which makes him unique compared to the other cutlery. He is never chosen in the kitchen, until something comes along that neither forks nor spoons can handle. His uniqueness comes in handy!

| by James, Betsy

Growing up is an exciting process, especially for Molly and her brother, Darvy. Molly discovers frog eggs while she is at the pond and is allowed to bring them home until they develop into frogs. While Darvy experiences developmental changes of his own, he learns how to walk. In the end, Darvy teaches Molly an unexpected lesson.

| by Bright, Robert

Jenny likes red, which is the color of her hair as well as many things in the world. One day she meets Tony, also a redhead, and they enjoy the world of red together.

| by Davol, Marguerite W.

A little girl who has a white father and a black mother compares the differences between them. Mama like to dance ballet and walk fast along the street. Papa likes to dance to rap and stroll along the street. They have different tastes in food and art, but all is just right in this special family.

| by Levinson, Riki

A girl's grandma tells her a bedtime story on Friday night of her mother's journey to the New World. She tells the girl how much she is like her great grandmother.
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