Browse Abstracts (97 total)

| by Carling, Amelia Lau

Mama and Papa have a store. Day to day the routine is similar. The same people come in to buy the same things. This little girl likes these routines and she shares them with us. From what Mama is cooking to Papa counting on the abacus we spend the whole day with one little girl.

| by Child, Lauren

Lola's brother goes to very creative lengths to encourage Lola to eat a variety of vegetables. When Lola refuses to eat peas, Charlie calls peas "green drops from Greenland". She then nibbles one or two and says quite tasty!

| by Grimes, Nikki

Xavier feels sad, angry, and jealous towards his new step brother, Chris. Xavier soon realizes that Chris is coping with loneliness and resentment too. The pain over losing a parent to divorce forms a special band between Xavier and Chris so they promise each other, that no one will ever leave. Through short vignettes, the story ends with Our family is a song we sing, and we can add new notes anytime we like.

| by DeBear, Kristen

Marina and Moira are very much alike, and yet very different. They like to play with one another, but often have conflicts. They learn to work through their differences and become the best of friends.

| by Wells, Rosemary

Kindergarten is no longer a mystery, thanks to Emily who illustrates the lessons and activities in Miss Cribbageï¾’s classroom. Many concepts are explored in this kindergarten classroom. Poems, songs, and activities keep the lessons light-hearted and enjoyable.

| by Lehman, Barbara

A friendship forms when two boys from different parts of the world find a magical red book. The boy from the urban city decides to use balloons to fly to the island where his new friend lives, but he accidentally drops the red book along the way. The boy on the island is disappointed when he can no longer view his city companion in the pages of the book, but is relieved when he lands on the beach instead! Back in the city, the red book is discovered by a man riding his bike on the street (A wordless book).

| by Falconer, Ian

After making breakfast for her two younger brothers, Olivia dresses herself and heads to school. Today is Olivia's turn to tell the class about her vacation. She tells of a time when all the circus people are sick and she has to run the entire show. She uses her imagination to tell about her experiences as a lion tamer, juggler, and more. Olivia then heads for home, talks with her mother, and goes to bed.

| by Banyai, Istvan

These artistic scenes aren't what you might think. Each is really a picture within a picture. Images zoom in and out from different perspectives and scenes from land, sea, and air in this wordless book.

| by Angelou, Maya

A young Ashanti boy describes some of the wonders of his life in and around the West African village of Bonwire.

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

As Emeka sets off to visit his grandmother in the next village, he wonders what he can take her for a present. He passes through the market and sees lots of things Granny would like - there were four brooms, five big hats to keep the sun off, six necklaces, eight water pots. But with no money, Emeka can not buy anything. Will Granny understand?

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

Ekinadose wants his Uncle Osaere to get married - then he can go to a wedding. One day, he sees people welcomed into his grandfather's house. They've come to collect their bride - and Edinadose will be going, not just to one wedding ceremony, but two!

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

Ogbo are a special part of village life in Nigeria, uniting children of the same age in a lifelong fellowship - a group with whom they celebrate festivals, share day-to-day chores, and face the challenges of growing up. A young girl named Obioma helps us understand what belonging to an ogbo means. Growing, working, and relaxing together, the ogbo weave the fabric of village life.

| by Wulfsohn, Gisele

Presents a day in the life of a child living in Johannesburg, discussing the social life, customs, religion, history, and language of South Africa.

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

The author, a member of the Igbo tribe in Nigeria, presents text and her own photographs of twenty-six things, from A-Z, representative of all African peoples.

| by Thomas, Mark

Children explore African dance with music and movement.

| by Angelou, Maya

Thandi, an eight-year-old Ndebele girl who lives in a village in South Africa with her mother, aunts, sisters, and mischievous younger brother, shares her secrets with her best friend, a chicken.

| by Henrietta

A content country mouse receives an invitation from a friend in the city. Her friend promises delightful foods but fails to mention a prowling dog and cat. While the country mouse finds her friend's house elegant and full of food, she would rather be in the country without the cat and dog.

| by Bloch, Serge//Cali, Davide

There are two soldiers, each in a hole, with an order to kill the other. They both are tired and want the war to end. Finally one gives up and goes off to kill the other, only to find he has done the same. He sees that the other soldier is more like himself than he thought. In a desperate measure to end the war he doesn't understand, he launches a message in a bottle to the other hold.

| by Michelson, Richard

A brother and sister are tired of always having to be quiet so as not to interrupt Grandpa Sam while he is praying. The children think they have a very boring grandfather. Grandpa Sam overhears the children and tells them the story of his life. He was born a Jew in Poland and to escape persecution he came to the United States. He learns to gamble to make a living but when his daughter becomes very ill he decides to lead an honest, humble life and pray every morning and night. The children are now amazed by their Grandpa Sam's story and respect his prayer time.
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