Browse Abstracts (97 total)

| by Rockwell, Lizzy

It is such a special time when there's a new baby on the way. This little boy has been involved in his new sister's life since the beginning. He went to the doctor with his mommy and helped unpack baby clothes. When his baby sister is born, he is the happiest boy in the world!

| by Falvey, David// Mrs. Julie Hutt's fourth-grade class

A collection of letters written by Mrs. Julie Hutt's fourth grade class to 1st Lieutenant David Falvey during his tour in Iraq. Read the students' letter to Lieutenant Falvey and his responses back to each individual student. Pictures of the letters, students, and Lieutenant Falvey's safe arrival back to the states are included!

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

Amarlai has a new baby cousin and he can't wait for her to be given a name. A tradtional African name will tell people where she comes from and which child she is in the family.

| by Daly, Niki

Jamela's mama has just bought some beautiful fabric for a new dress. While she's watching it dry outside in the South African air, Jamela wraps it around herself and starts parading down the street. Everyone is watching her, she is so proud. When she gets home, Jamela finds her mama very upset because her fabric is ruined. With the help of a friend, Jamela buys her mama more fabric. At this South African wedding, both Jamela and her mama are beautiful in their new dresses.

| by Cave, Kathryn

Play a simple counting game. Watch a pumpkin grow. Follow young Nothando and discover the rhythms of her daily life in her South African village.

| by Mandel, Peter

Willie Mays grows up in a time when black athletes were separate from white athletes in America. But due to Willie's baseball skills, the New York Giants recruit him. Willie breaks many baseball records because of his fast running and powerful hitting power.

| by McClintock, Barbara

Danielle loves to draw and use her imagination. While her father photographs real things, she spends her time drawing flying fish and dogs with human heads. One day her father becomes ill, and Danielle has to find a way to help her father get well and raise enough money for them to survive. She finds a way by doing what she loves, drawing.

| by Watts, Barrie

A series of photographs help explain the life of a potato from shoot to tuber. Soon the potato is ready to be dug up and eaten.

| by Watts, Barrie

A series of photographs help explain the life of a tomato from seed to pollinization to being ripe enough to be picked off the vine.

| by Robinson, Fay

Photographs show that vegetables come from leaves, roots, or flowers of certain plants. Differences between a fruit and a vegetable are shown, plus how vegetables can be eaten and prepared.

| by Hoban, Tana

Sequential photographs show the numbers, 1 through 100

| by McMillan, Bruce

Fruits and vegetables illustrate a rainbow of colors.

| by Soto, Gary

A young girl, Maya, retells the events of a Mexican-American family wedding by looking back through the wedding photos. From the excitement of being a flower girl, to the ceremony itself, to the music and dancing afterwards, she recalls many happy memories.

| by McGrath, Barbara Barbieri

Have fun with your cereal, even after breakfast time!Counting is made easy with Cheerios and fruits. Practice counting to ten, counting teens, and seeing patterns of tens.

| by Cushman, Doug

The great detective Seymour Sleuth and his assistant travel to Egypt in search of a missing stone chicken, part of the lost treasure of King Karfu. They explore many clues and take photographs.

| by Lewin, Ted

Abdul and his grandfather travel the streets of Fez, Morocco on the way to work. After passing merchants, carpenters and other citizens hard at work, grandfather spreads out a carpet to begin his job, telling stories to a crowd.

| by Hoban, Tana

Photographs of letters, numbers, and coins help to introduce the alphabet and how to count some common amounts of money.

| by McMillan, Bruce

Math is fun and in this case -- delicious!As each child displays the number of jelly beans, coins are also displayed to show the correct and equal amount of money.

| by Pak, Soyung

A little boy name Juno receives a letter from his grandmother in Seoul, Korea. He's unable to read the letter since it is written in her native language, but he's able to gain an understanding of it from the photograph and dried flower that accompanies it. Juno decides to send a letter of his own in a very inventive way.
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