Browse Abstracts (237 total)

| by Bulla, Clyde Robert

Where do shadows come from?They come from light!When the sun shines on something, because it can't shine through it, it leaves a dark spot from the object. This dark spot is the shadow. Even your body can cast a shadow.

| by Udry, Janice May

A group of children, who call themselves the moon jumpers, love to play outside at night under the moon. They dance, play tag, make a camp and pretend they are on an island. When their mother calls them in to go to sleep, they dream of tomorrow's sun.

| by Watson, Clyde

This book tells children that when they fall asleep, the sandman takes them to visit the man in the moon. Sandman tells stories of all the wonderful things he has seen on earth. Then the children go back to their beds.

| by Hort, Lenny

While their mom is gone, a boy and his dad go out to count the stars in the sky.

| by Delton, Judy

A girl and her father go out in the snow together. They see many of the normal sights, but they look different at night covered with snow. They stop at a local cafe to get hot chocolate before bundling up their coats and walking home.

| by Sendak, Maurice

Kenny has a dream one night while he is sleeping. He dreams that if he answers seven questions correctly, his dream will come true. There is an unexpected ending to the story when Kenny changes his mind.

| by Heine, Helme

All you have to do is yawn and your sleep adventures will follow.

| by Desimini, Lisa

A house is described and beautifully illustrated as it changes throughout a day and the seasons.

| by London, Jonathan

A group of children enjoy a beautiful summer day by swimming, playing in the hot sun, picnicking, and skipping rocks. Their day ends as they look up at the stars and dream of what tomorrow will bring.

| by Pilkey, Dav

Dragon helps a stray cat warm up from the snowy outside night. Dragon names the cat and tries to take care of him. Realizing that he does not know how to care for a cat, he goes to the pet store and asks for help.

| by Paradis, Susan

A little boy observes his father crossing the street, running outside in the rain, mowing the grass, riding his bike and diving into the ocean. The boy has great admiration for his father and everything his father does seems extraordinary to him. When the boy's father hugs him and throws him in the air, the boy feels very special and loved.

| by Jonas, Ann

A child receives a patchwork quilt made up of fabrics that have special meaning. One bedtime, the quilt serves as background for a nightime adventure for the child and her stuffed dog, Sally.

| by Lum, Kate

It is Patrick's first time to sleep over at Granny's house. When it is time for him to go to bed, Patrick tells his Granny that he does not have a bed, so Granny chops down some trees for wood and makes him a bed. Patrick then tells his Granny that he did not have a pillow at her house, so Granny collected feathers from her chickens and made him a pillow. Granny also has to make Patrick a blanket and teddy bear, but by the time she is finished, it is morning.

| by Skofield, James

A little boy is awakened by the sounds of the night. He goes outside with his parents and enjoys the night by dancing with nature until he gets tired and goes back to bed.

| by Alarcon, Francisco X.

A bilingual collection of humorous and serious poems about family, nature, and celebrations.

| by Spohn, David

Nate, Matt, and their dad go camping. The three enjoy the stars and each other's company. They stoke the fire and settle down for the chilly night.

| by Whitcher, Susan

Sylvie is a little girl who believes that the moon is magic. Even after her parents try to explain how big and far away the moon is, Sylvie still believes that the moon fell behind the neighbor's lilac bush. Sylvie believes that she saves the moon.

| by Coy, John

When a young boy goes on a trip with his dad, they drive all night to get to the mountains. During the trip, the little boy learns many things from his father as they share many activities along the way.

| by Hughes, Shirley

More than twenty rhymes tell about the daily life and activities of a young girl named Annie Rose. The playful poems cover several topics including animals, people, seasons, routines and adventures that children love.

| by Sturges, Phileman

In this repetitive story, two children catch ten fireflies and keep them in a jar. Eventually they release them one by one.
In partnership with the Center for Digital Scholarship at Miami University Libraries
Powered by Omeka