Browse Abstracts (239 total)

| by Hickman, Martha Whitmore

After his parents divorce, Robert goes to live with his grandparents. Robert's father moves away and his mother goes into drug rehabilitation. Even though Robert loves his grandparents, he is embarrassed to bring them to Parent's Day at school.

| by Chlad, Dorothy

Darryl lives in a place where it snows a lot in the winter. He describes some of the activities he does with his friends and family like building a snowman, making snow angels, shoveling the sidewalk, sledding, and ice skating. In order to enjoy these activities, safety rules need to be observed, so Darryl gives five basic rules to follow.

| by Sanders, Stephanie

Now that Q.T. Pie is finished with her chores, she can join her friends outside for play. But when it starts to rain, she must find something fun to do indoors. With help from her mom, Q.T. discovers how to catch a rainbow inside her own house!With colored beads strung in her hair, Q.T. can now wear her very own rainbow.

| by Miles, Calvin

Calvin is worried that his parents are Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus after his two friends tell him that this is true. Calvin is relieved and excited when he receives a bike for Christmas, which confirms his belief in Santa Claus.

| by Williams, Vera B

Evie receives everything she wants from her family, including something new to wear and a kite to fly. One of the best things Evie receives is a song from her father.

| by Chlad, Dorothy

Jackie is going to the playground with her friends. She explains six simple rules she follows to ensure her safety and to make sure she has fun. Her six rules are never go to the playground alone, always go with friends, do not walk in front of swings, wait at the bottom of the slide, always hold on tight, and be careful and alert.

| by Hru, Dakari

April and Erica love to Double Dutch, but they have no friends to Double Dutch with. When their Uncle Zambezi returns from a trip to Tanzania, he gives the girls a jump rope that will grant wishes because it is made from magic moonberries. The girls Double Dutch and wish for two new friends to arrive. Suddenly, a moving van pulls up, and a family with a boy and girl moves in across the street.

| by Burleigh, Robert

Miles Davis loves music. Wherever he is, Miles can feel music. Miles dreams of playing his trumpet with the great saxophonist, Charlie Bird Parker, so he travels to New York City to find him. After many hours of searching, Miles finds Bird and the two play beautiful music together.

| by Battle-Lavert, Gwoddolyn

Derrick, a young African American boy, learns to make music on the harmonica. Uncle Booker T., a talented musician, spends each day, one hot summer, teaching Derrick the art of playing the harmonica. Finally, after much practice and determination, Derrick discovers the secret of Uncle Booker T.'s music: it comes from the heart.

| by Humphrey, Margo

When Yanava and her friends find out that Neema, the elder woman of the town, is losing her sight they decide to make special gifts for her. While sitting next to the river pondering over what to give Neema, Yanava is called to put her hands in the river. The river helps her hands produce a rainbow, which gives Neema the light she needs to see.

| by McKissack, Patricia C.

David Earl knows what day of the week it is by the color of Ma Dear's aprons. She wears a different apron each day to reflect the day's chores. Ma Dear is a single, hard-working mother from the South that creates a loving home for her son.

| by Bang, Molly

While counting backwards from ten to one, a father and his daughter get ready for bedtime.

| by Polacco, Patricia

A wounded solider in the Civil War is nurtured back to health by an African American soldier and his mother. Together they return to the battlefield, but are destined to live different lives.

| by Farmer, Nancy

Sim Webb is finally getting his chance to work on a train for the famous Casey Jones. Casey is putting a brand new whistle on his train, but Casey knows it's a bad idea. He knows that something bad is about to happen.

| by Krull, Kathleen

As a young girl, Wilma Rudolph contracted polio. Through hard work, she is able to walk without her leg brace. She plays basketball in high school, goes to college on a track scholarship, and wins three gold medals in the 100, 200, and 4x100 meter dashes.

| by Steptoe, John

Hector is a new student in Charles' class from Puerto Rico. Hector has trouble adjusting to his new school at first, but Charles recognizes his differences as being creative, and helps him feel welcome.

| by San Souci, Robert D.

John and Clara work very hard all day, but they have no children to love. One night Clara finds two little white stones and brings them home with her. When they came home the next night all of the chores had been done, and John and Clara must find out who their helpers are and how to help them!

| by Crews, Donald

Each summer, young Donald Crews takes a train ride and car ride to Bigmama's farm. He plays with the his cousins on the big porch, then explores the shed, outhouse, toolshed, stable, barn, and pond for fishing. His family gathers around a big table to eat and celebrate being together.

| by Schroeder, Alan

Jumper never wants to stop dancing, especially after she wins a dance contest.

| by Taylor, Mildred D.

Jeremy Simms, a young white boy, lives in a small town in Mississippi that is segregated. One foggy, rainy day, a bus full of people (mostly whites since some black people had been thrown off to make room for the whites), heads across the bridge and, because of the weather, crashes through the railing and into the water below. Blacks and whites, together, come to the rescue.
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