Browse Abstracts (19 total)

| by Bridges, Shirin Yim

Ruby is known for wearing red and being an exceptionally bright student. Even during a time in China when ...most girls were never taught to read and write. However, Ruby's grandfather hires a teacher to come to the house, making it possible for any grandchild living in the house to learn. This initiates a desire in Ruby to attend university, a place that women in China were not encouraged to go.\r\n*Based on a true story of the author's grandmother.

| by Shea, Pegi Deitz // Weill, Cynthia

A group of mice prepare for Tet, the Vietnamese New Year. The mice plan parties and a feast to celebrate.

| by Katz, Karen

Gung Hay Fat Choy! Happy New Year! A Chinese child is getting ready for the Chinese New Year by decorating the walls with red, making an alter to honor ancestors, getting a new dress to wear, and getting a haircut to start the new year off fresh and new. They eat a New Year's Eve feast for the good health and finally the New Year's parade with lion dancers, drummers, and the dragon! Then, they wish each other Gung Hay Fat Choy!

| by Ryland, Cynthia

The promises of a new year are given through rhyme and soft illustrations.

| by Keating, Norma

Through Mr. Chu, the reader learns about Chinese food, music, traditions, and celebrations including the Chinese New Year.

| by Gleeson, Libby

Jen, her sister, and a friend decide to scare a dog with their dragon costume for the Chinese New Year's dance. When they roar and try to scare the dog, the dog is very friendly to the girls and allows them to pet him.

| by Low, William

Chinatown is a city that is home to street cobblers, herbalists, tai chi masters, kung fu students, fish markets, and restaurants. And best of all, the celebration of the Chinese New Year which has a parade and lion dance!

| by Zalben, Breskin Jane

Beni is so excited because he's finally old enough to really understand his Jewish heritage and the traditions of his faith. In his quest for understanding, he encounters a number of situations, from learning the beauty of togetherness after reconciling with his feuding cousin, Max, to recreating the Pukim in a play with his friends and cousins. Through all of this, Beni truly begins to see the magical feeling of togetherness and heritage that his religion encompasses.

| by Anno, Mitsumasa

Eight children from eight different countries are shown at the same time each day over two days. The contrasts and similarities of the children and their activities are described.

| by Carter, Alden R.

Dustin is so excited!His family is going to have a baby girl!Dustin's mom and dad teach him all about being a big brother. He even learns how to change diapers!When the baby finally arrives, Dustin shows what a great brother he is.

| by Grifalconi, Ann

Flyaway girl needs to learn to be a wise little woman for the New Year in her village. She is against the whole idea at first, but then she thinks it would not be that bad.

| by Handford, Thomas

Mei Li is celebrating New Year's Day with her family. But, she isn't allowed to the fair because she is a girl. She sneaks off to the fair and encounters many adventures.

| by Vangheli, Spiridon

Through a collection of eight short stories, young Guguze and his family enjoy adventures from season to season.

| by Strand, Keith

A young couple embarks on their own to an unknown land to build their life. When times get hard for their family, they adjust their lifestyles to make things work.

| by Rattigan, Jama Kim

Marisa, a young Asian American girl, attempts to help make the dumplings for dumpling soup which her family has been making for generations. She hold a strong sense of pride, honor, and love in her heart for her family.

| by Liang, Yen

Dee-dee and Boo celebrate the Chinese New Year with their family. The celebration includes decorations, dancing, and fireworks.

| by Oakley, Graham

Humphrey, a church mouse, makes a New Year's Resolution to write the story of his life. Instead he keeps a journal because he would not know what happens in the last chapter.

| by Politi, Leo

Moy Moy is the youngest sister who is fascinated by toys and bright celebrations. She sees and is in the Chinese New Year Parade where she is no longer afraid of the lion.

| by Raskin, Ellen

A mouse wants to join the other animals in a special celebration but must choose what to wear. The mouse finally chooses a blouse and is invited for a Christmas and New Year gathering on Twenty-two, Twenty-three.
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