Browse Abstracts (123 total)

| by Drucker, Malka

Molly tries to beat her grandmother at grating potatoes, but her grandma is too fast. As Molly and her grandmother make latkes for Hanukkah, her grandmother tells a story about why they celebrate Hanukkah.

| by Haseley, Dennis

A young man leaves home, marries, and begins to fly kites. He teaches his son the joy of kite flying, and with each changing event in their lives, a new kite is launched. When the son wants to travel, too, they make a very symbolic kite for both of them.

| by Cohen, Barbara

A young Russian Jewish girl has difficulties assimilating with the American culture. Making friends is difficult for Molly when other children cannot understand her background. A special birthday celebration finally brings the girls together.

| by Dupasquier, Philippe

Every month of the year, this family has seasonal traditions that they do together.

| by Yarbrough, Camille

The traditions and history of African American family life are shared throughout history.

| by Zalben, Breskin Jane

Beni is so excited because he's finally old enough to really understand his Jewish heritage and the traditions of his faith. In his quest for understanding, he encounters a number of situations, from learning the beauty of togetherness after reconciling with his feuding cousin, Max, to recreating the Pukim in a play with his friends and cousins. Through all of this, Beni truly begins to see the magical feeling of togetherness and heritage that his religion encompasses.

| by Johnston, Tony

A quilt is passed from one generation to the rest. It holds many of the same meanings for each generation.

| by Leaf, Munro

Stick figures are used to demonstrate good manners and how to act properly for play, home, and visits.

| by Lyon, George Ella

Over the years, Grandma's basket becomes embedded in many family legends. The basket is passed through four generations. The spool of thread found inside the basket is symbolic of the generations threaded together by love.

| by Matze, Claire Sidhom

Alex enjoys a brief but special visit of his grandfather to the United States from the Middle East. They spend a lot of time together as Alex learns of his grandfather's homeland, customs, religion, and language.

| by Wells, Rosemary

As Berty grows up, life on the farm is full of simplicity, hardwork, and tradition. Berty's older brother, Luke, has aspirations of traveling to see the world. This makes life a little more complicated for Berty so he wishes upon an evening star.

| by Reddix, Valerie

Every year, Tad-Tin and his grandfather make a special kite to fly on Kite's Day. This year Grandfather is sick, so it is up to Tin to sacrifice his special Dragon kite in order to carry all their misfortune away.

| by Manushkin, Fran

A little girl and her family celebrate the Passover Seder in repeating rhyme form. The family feasts on matzah, bitter herbs, green vegetables, and haroset.

| by Nye, Naomi Shihab

Mona's grandmother Sitti lives on the other side of the world. Even though they don't speak the same language, they find a way to communicate and become very good friends.

| by Luenn, Nancy

Rosita and her grandmother are very close. Rosita's grandmother teaches Rosita how to braid, garden, and make tortillas. When Rosita's grandmother dies, Rosita feels a great loss without her around and misses her terribly. Her family tells Rosita that she can make a gift to give to her grandmother on the Day of the Dead. Rosita braids a cord that is filled with love and memories for her grandmother.

| by Bruchac, Joseph

Jamie remembers her grandmother and all the things that they did together. These memories help Jamie deal with the loss of her grandmother.

| by Joosse, Barbara M.

An annual family reunion involving berry picking and jam making, reminds Ben that he is part of a big family, even though his immediate family is small. It is also a noisy family of grandparents, cousins, uncles, and aunts.

| by Hest, Amy

In order to get to Grandpa's house for the traditional pancake breakfast, Baby duck has to walk in the rain. Baby duck doesn't like the rain but his grandpa shows him a way to enjoy it.

| by Ryan, Pam Munoz

Families can be made up of one to one hundred people joined by heritage, community, friendship, and love, all working together for a better life.
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