Browse Abstracts (37 total)

| by Hoffman, Eric

Nate finds it difficult to decide which color is his favorite. Every time he sees a new color, he likes it better than the other. He learns that he can have more than one favorite color.

| by Litchfield, Ada B.

Uncle Joe has Down Syndrome and must leave his home at the hospital because it's closing. He goes to live with his sister and her family. His family learns to live with him and to love him.

| by Hoban, Lillian

Arthur longs to be his pen pal's big brother, so they can wrestle and do karate. He does not like having to jump rope with his little sister. But one day, he learns something very surprising about his pen pal.

| by Johnson, Angela

One morning, after a night of rain, Minnie and her sister sneak out of the house to join many men and women to march for freedom and equality. When they arrive at the beginning of the march, the girls walk with many others keeping their eyes straight ahead and their feet steady. Despite the criticism and yells from people standing by, the girls continue to march. As the day passes, more people join the march to where Dr. Martin Luther King gives his famous speech about peace, love, and equality for all.

| by Annoh, G. Kwesi

Two sisters in Ghana pursue their dreams of becomming career women. They receive help from their parents and teachers, and work hard to study math and science. Abena becomes a mathematician and Akousa becomes a medical officer in public health.

| by Gershater, Phillis

Challenging stereotypical gender roles, Tiny and Bigman illustrate the unique people skills people have to help the world go around and to make a happy family. Tiny learns to use her large size, strength, and booming voice to help people in her community. Tiny falls in love with a small man who is hard of hearing. She builds their house, and he cooks and cleans.

| by Graham, Bob

Rose's nice cheerful family moves next door to Mr. Wintergarten, a man who has not seen daylight in years. When Rose's ball goes over the fence, despite many warnings, she retrieves it. She brings cookies to Mr. Wintergarten and becomes his friend. Mr. Wintergarten is less lonely.

| by Hoelstlandt, Jo

Helen doesn't understand why her best friend, Lydia, has to wear a yellow star. On the eve of Helen's birthday, Nazis begin rounding up Jews. Their friendship is lost forever.

| by Yezerski, Thomas

Keara and Stefan are from Ireland and Poland, respectively, and each tell the stories of their families. They meet in the United States in Pinecone Patch, PA. They overcome deep stereotypes and prejudices to be married and bring two families together.

| by Mochizuki, Ken

Shorty and his family are sent to an American camp after an attack on Pearl Harbor because they are Japanese-American. To help keep their spirits up, the people at the camp make a baseball field and play games. Shorty learns how to believe in himself, even when others do not treat him nicely.

| by Scieszka, Jon//Smith, Lane

The moral of the story changes with every page depending upon the fable, the ani keeping his talent to himself, he decides to go out into the forest to sing. What he finds is no one believes a frog can sing, so frog has to keep going until someone gives him a chance.

| by Goss, Linda

Frog wants to do something no frog has ever done before; sing!He practices and practices until he gets so tired of keeping his talent to himself, he decides to go out into the forest to sing. What he finds is no one believes a frog can sing, so frog has to keep going until someone gives him a chance.

| by Hoban, Russell

Frances does not want to play with Gloria because she is young and small. Albert does not want to play with Frances because she is a girl. They all decided to play together, and each realizes how bad it feels to be left out.

| by Cohen, Barbara

A young Russian Jewish girl has difficulties assimilating with the American culture. Making friends is difficult for Molly when other children cannot understand her background. A special birthday celebration finally brings the girls together.

| by Hoffman, Mary//Binch, Caroline

Grace loves to act out stories or fantasies. When her school decides to put on a production of Peter Pan, she wants to be Peter. Everyone says she cannot because she is a black girl. She dances and practices a lot for the audition and at the audition it is evident that she will be the best Peter Pan.

| by Zolotow, C.

William wants a doll to play with. His brothers and father make fun of him. They buy him a ball and an electric train, but William still wants a doll. His Grandma comes to visit and buys him the doll he wants.

| by Gosselin, Kim

Having asthma is never easy. Come learn the basics of asthma through the alphabet: A is for asthma, B is for bronchial tubes, C is for can't catch, and D is for dust mites.

| by Oppenheim, Shulamaith

Miriam, who is Jewish, must go live with another family in the country because the Germans are killing the Jews. She learns a new life in the country and successfully hides when the soldiers come to look for her.

| by Wilson, S.

Tildy sets sail over Spooner Bay, being warned to beware of the dragons. When she encounters the dragons, she finds them friendly, and realizes that they only want to play. She decides to teach the town about the friendly dragons.

| by Peet, Bill

Pamela is fed up with everyone calling her dumb, so she escapes from the circus. That night she finds a break in the train tracks, and she saves a train. Now everyone loves her.
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