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Ancona, George
Children from all backgrounds move and dance to different rhythms of their culture. Dances range from tap to folk dances and from Native American dance to Tibetan dance. There are many forms, types, and styles of dance a person can do to express their emotions. There are different dances for men, women, animals, and puppets too!

Barner, Bob
A child uses rhyme to describe the insects she sees. The actual sizes of the bugs are included, as well as a bug-o-meter, which tells where the bug lives, how many legs the bug has, if it can fly, and if it stings.

Barnes, Derrick
Illustrations and easy-to-read text pay homage to the strength, character, and worth of a child.

Bateman, Teresa
The grandkids are excited to visit grandma and grandpa's farm. Today is April Fool's and they want to trick grandpa. The grandkids can't understand why grandpa remains so calm when they tell him all the animals have escaped. Grandma lends a hand to help trick grandpa.

Bauer, Marion
Join in with this storybook rhyme about exploring the body parts and what they do! From your hands, to your feet, and from your ears to your nose, learn about body actions and senses through rhyme, alliteration and a fun steady beat!

Beaumont, Karen
An African American girl tells about the characteristics she likes about herself and the different circumstances in which she likes herself. She is proud of herself no matter where she is or what silly things she is doing. She knows what really counts is inside her and shares this knowledge in an energetic story with imaginative illustrations.

Berkes, Marianne
Count one through 10 while using rhymes to talk about different activities between mother fishes and their babies. Move to the rhythm of this poem about ocean creatures !

Blanco, Alberto
The last of the desert mermaids is found living in an oasis in the Sonara desert. An Indian and his horse take her on a journey to find the roots of her ancestors. Here she finds the gift of song and can finally join the thousands of mermaids riding the waves.

Boedoe, Geefwee
In the town of Arrowville disagreement and frenzy is a way of life, but a young girl named Barb wants to agree and get along. She gets in trouble for this and runs away. At the same time the Targets make a wrong turn and end up in Arrowville. The Arrows think they are invaders. It is Barb who helps the Arrows and Targets come together and understand each other.

Brisson, Pat
Annabelle Applegate had Tap-dance fever. Her feet are constantly on the move, tapping everywhere she goes. The townsfolk are very aggrevated by her dancing. However, once tourists come to hear and see her tao-dance with the rattlesnakes, the townsfolk believe she was an asset to the community.

Brown, Margaret Wise
The big red barn has many different farm animals that live in it. All the animals go out and play on the day when the children are not there.

Brown, Margaret Wise
In the winter, it is too cold for the animals to be outside but the barn is warm. All the horses, cattle, mice, birds, and cats stay there together to keep away from the cold. Even though there are a lot of animals in the barn, they all get along and help to keep each other warm.

Bryan, Ashley
Colorful birds in the forest want to be like the blackbird. The blackbird teaches the other birds that each one is beautiful in its own unique way and that beauty does not come from a color.

Bunting, Eve
Here's a new twist on the alphabet, just for girls. For each letter of the alphabet, read a girl's name and her career matching that letter.

Burleigh, Robert
Miles Davis loves music. Wherever he is, Miles can feel music. Miles dreams of playing his trumpet with the great saxophonist, Charlie Bird Parker, so he travels to New York City to find him. After many hours of searching, Miles finds Bird and the two play beautiful music together.

Burleigh, Robert
Being a bicycle messenger in a big city is a rigorous job, but someone has to do it. The messenger wakes early and works late to deliver the proper messages to their appropriate places. Nothing can stop him, not rain, snow, or distractions of others.

Bynum, Eboni//Jackson, Roland
Jamari grows up drawn to the beating of the djembe, the keeper of the peace, the great drum of his Mali village. Jamari grows older and becomes the drummer of the djembe. He eventually gets caught up in other aspects of village life. When the village is once again threatened by the nearby angry mountain, Jamari returns to his post as drummer for village peace.

Cabrera, Jane
Come join the frogs, lions, and elephants as they spin around, stamp their feet, and flap their arms to the song If you're happy and you know it.

Chocolate, Debbie
A young girl listens to her grandfather share his deep love for music and the piano. Grandfather shares the history of silent movies, Vaudeville, Ragtime, and Broadway. He never lets his passion for music end and continues to share it with his grandaughter.

Coleman, Evelyn
Daddy Wes whispers to his two young children about the history of Africans forced into slavery and how the pulse of the drum has moved through them over time. Daddy Wes promises his children that as long as they can hear the heartbeat of the earth, they will be free.

Collier, Bryan
Join this boy's pride as he shares his town's sights and sounds the way he sees and hears them. You'll see Harlem along the river, street, and neighborhood.

Cousins, Lucy
Follow Maisy as he experiences all the different kinds of weather and how to dress and have fun in each kind. sun, rain, snow and wind conditions require different clothing! Maisy calls each one a wonderful choice of weather day!

Cummings, Phil
A mouse starts a musical trend by tapping a cup. Other animals join in and the music soon turns into a band. The band meets other animals with louder music and they join together to make a large orchestra of musical animals.

Dahl, Michael
Two pigs decide to make a pie. They put in many different ingredients two-by-two.

Denton, Kady MacDonald
A collection of nursery rhymes provides children with rhyming skills and patterns. Over 100 nursery rhymes are remembered through illustrations, songs, and verse.

dePaola, Arnold L.
Everyone knows that people communicate through talking. What about animals? How do animals communicate? Looking at different animals we can see that each kind of animal communicates in its own unique way using different sounds.

Donald, Rhonda
Variations on traditional children's songs and poems will have children chiming in about cactuses, camels, and more as they learn about the desert habitat and its flora and fauna. A tarkawara (kangaroo rat) hops on the desert sand instead of a kookaburra sitting in an old gum tree. And teapots aren't the only things that are short and stout-just look at the javelina's hooves and snout. Travel the world's deserts to dig with meerkats, fly with bats, and hiss with Gila monsters! Whether sung or read aloud, "Deep in the Desert" makes learning about deserts anything but dry.

Dotlich, Rebecca Kai
Predictable rhyming patterns and basic themes, such as nature, animals, food, and so much more, work together to complete this collection of thirty-two jump rope rhymes.

Dr. Suess
A little boy makes unique noises instead of talking. He doesn't seem to fit in anywhere and is lonely. He is found by a man who has a radio station. He appreciates the boy's abilities.

Evans, Freddi Williams
Simmy is both excited and nervous for his job as Scout during the community meeting. Simmy is excited because this means the elders trust him, but he is nervous because slaves are not supposed to gather and sing together. Simmy must be very careful and listen for the master during the meeting.

Fisher, Doris//Sneed, Dani
A young boy awakens to find everything around him is モodd.ヤ He has one shoe, his shirt has three sleeves, and his dog has five legs. Things are crazy at school when he stares at a calendar with only odd days. Will his odd day end when he goes to bed that night?

Fisher, Doris and Sneed, Dani
A sequel to One Odd Day, this time the young boy awakens to find that it is another strange day: everything is even! His mother has two heads, and a trip to the zoo is dealt with in an odd, but even-handed, manner.

Frame, Jean Ashford
A family explores the various emotions they face each day. Through the use of colors, the main character realizes that even with all the ups and downs of emotions, one color really matters- LOVE of family.

Glaser, Byron // Higashi, Sandra
Learn your alphabet with a dog named Ozlo. Bright illustrations and imaginative characters form a rhythmic pattern of rhyme and fun words.

Grifalconi, Ann
Jimmy's dad talks about keeping up with the rhythm of the city, but Jimmy doesn't understand what his dad means until the end of the summer when Jimmy makes the city rhythms his own.

Grimes, Nikki
Xavier feels sad, angry, and jealous towards his new step brother, Chris. Xavier soon realizes that Chris is coping with loneliness and resentment too. The pain over losing a parent to divorce forms a special band between Xavier and Chris so they promise each other, that no one will ever leave. Through short vignettes, the story ends with Our family is a song we sing, and we can add new notes anytime we like.

Grimes, Nikki
A young couple welcomes a new baby to the world, and introduces the baby to the wonders of nature: the rainbow, birds, grass and sunlight. The new baby is also introduced to caring relationships and love- and the pictures illustrate the miracle of it all.

Hayes, Ann
Join the parade as the drum major leads the rest of the marching smithereens down the street towards the cheering crowd. Each animal plays a different instrument to make a sound the crowd loves.

Heller, Nicholas
Twenty-six ogres live under the trap door. When you open it, you can see them feasting on foods from A-Z!Do not let them hear your tummy rumble or the ogres will disappear!

Hest, Amy
Mr. George Baker is a 100 year old musician who lives next door to Harry, a young schoolboy. They wait for the school bus together each morning to take them to school. They are both learning to read, and helping each other along the way.

Hoberman, Mary Ann
Whose garden is it? A garden belongs to everyone because many contribbuted to its growth.

Hoce, Charley
Visit all the animals on old MacDonald's Farm and and learn how they really acted while learning language skills. Through rhyming poems, see all the silly moments and experiences the animals had living down on the farm!

Holman, Sandy Lynne
Montsho struggles with the dark color of his skin. Everything around him that is black is considered bad. Thankfully, Muntsho's grandfather teaches him to appreciate his black skin by telling him stories about his African heritage.

Hooks, Bell
A whimsical rhythm of sweet jive jumps from watercolored illustrations on different pages to portray portraits of little girls who celebrate their African American culture. Hooray for the frizzy, fuzzy, nappy, twisty hair!Hooray for the sizzling semblance and fantastic flare that shines in every hair on every head. Beauty lies everywhere.

Hubbell, Patricia
Trains, trains, trains! Giant engines snorting, puffing, steaming, pulling, rushing, huffing! All kinds of trains, from cabooses to hoppers and commuter trains to zoo trains, run clickety-clack along the tracks.

Hutchings, Amy//Hutchings, Richard
Gummy candy is fun to eat, but it can be just as fun to count too!Learning to count from one to twelve is made easy through rhyming. Vivid photographs of assorted gummies helps to make exploring sets of numbers interesting and more meaningful.

Ipcizade, Catherine
A zoo prepares for Zoo Day. But things do not go according to plan. The llamas won't quit spitting; the giraffes are drooling; and the zebras aren't happy at all with their stripes! Meanwhile, the zookeepers scurry this way and that, clean up poop, ring mealtime bells, and try to get the animals bathed. Will the zookeeper end up spending the night at the zoo? Will Zoo Day go off without a hitch, or will the dancing monkeys take over? This fun story is an adaptation of the classic, 'Twas the Night Before Christmas.

Ireland, Karin
A little boy talks about taking a variety of animals into public places. Using his imagination he describes what could possibly happen. In the end, he advises to just take people along and leave the animals at home.

Jackson, Alison
With rhythm and rhyme, an old lady swallows an entire pie at a family's Thanksgiving dinner. After eating them out of house and home, the old lady is finally full.

Johnsson, James Weldan
Lift every voice puts pictures to the African American National Anthem. The lyrics tell the story of Black people's past struggles and the hope that Blacks will continue to have towards their future.