Browse Abstracts (133 total)

| by Prestine, Joan Singleton

A young girl has a day full of different moods. Although she starts out happy, she begins to feel different throughout the day. She does not want to share with her friend and gets upset when he plays with her toys. She learns what she should have said to make her family and friends understand.

| by Crary, Elizabeth

Unable to rollerskate like his brother and sister, Alex becomes frustrated. What should he do?Keep practicing, give up, or set goals?Alex's mom gives him eight suggestions of how to deal with his problem. After working really hard, Alex learns how to skate and deal with his frustration!

| by Booth, Barbara

Mandy, a hearing-impaired girl, spends time at her grandmother's house. On a walk in the woods, her grandmother's precious pin is lost. Mandy goes out alone in a storm that night to find the pin.

| by Wells, Rosemary

Max and Ruby go shopping to get a birthday present for Grandma. They spend their money on other things however, and don't have enough for what they want to get. Grandma is happy with her present at the end anyway.

| by Hoban, Lillian

Arthur wants to earn enough money to buy a t-shirt and matching cap so he decides, with the help of his sister, to have a bike wash. He must use his math skills to figure out when he has reached his goal. However, he must first decide how to overcome a few obstacles.

| by Willems, Mo

Trixie, her daddy, and her trusty bunny companion are heading to the laundry mat. While there, Trixie helps her daddy sort the clothes. Unfortunately, Trixieメs bunny becomes part of the dryer pile. Trixieメs dad doesnメt realize that the bunny is in the dryer. In trying to get his attention Trixie says her first word. In the end, she and both parents run to retrieve Knuffle Bunny.

| by Bradby, Marie

Booker and all the other African Americans have been set free. Money is tight and food is scarce, but the one thing that Booker cares most about is learning to read. His mother gives him an alphabet book, so he seeks the help of a man who knows how to read.

| by Rodda, Emily

For his birthday, a young boy gets a video game and keeps playing until he wins.

| by Chall, Marsha Wilson

Jean Claude is going to boarding school, but no dogs are allowed at La School d'Excellence. Poor Bonaparte must find a way to be with Jean Claude!

| by Alderson, Sue Ann

Bonnie is trying to entertain herself. In the process she makes mischief and irritates her mother. Mommy's anger disturbs Bonnie. She doesn't understand why Mommy gets mad and why she doesn't play with her. Bonnie confronts her and then Mommy realizes that her daughter needs her very much.

| by Say, Allen

Emma is a talented child artist who always finds her inspiration in an old rug. After her mother ruins the rug by washing it, Emma must discover that she can still draw without it.

| by Wells, Rosemary

Young Max and his older sister Ruby are making cakes for their grandmother's birthday. Max adds ingredients for his cake to the shopping list, but the grocer doesn't know what it says until Max thinks to draw a picture of what he wants.

| by Daly, Niki

Angelo Polo is a young boy who passionately wants to be a clown like his grandfather Zan Polo. His grandfather tells him that the theater is no place for a little boy. Finally, Zan Polo tells Angelo that he can be the little red rooster who crows in the last act. So, Angelo scurries and runs all over the city to prepare for his performance during the carnival. It turns out that Angelo is an excellent rooster and his grandfather agrees that the theater can be a place for a little boy.

| by Bond, Felicia

Poinsettia pig gets tired of sharing the crowded family house with her six brothers and sisters. She throws a tantrum when she cannot find a spot to read her book. When the family leaves and she is left alone, she becomes lonely and learns to appreciate her family.

| by Joosse, Barbara M.

When Dinah is sent to her room, she and her mother both work out their frustratrions in different ways. Dinah wishes bad things would happen to her mother, but then she changes her mind, and the two of them reconcile.

| by Stevenson, James

When Warren comes for a brief visit, he acts like his great-uncle and proves even more difficult to get along with.

| by James, Betsy

Growing up is an exciting process, especially for Molly and her brother, Darvy. Molly discovers frog eggs while she is at the pond and is allowed to bring them home until they develop into frogs. While Darvy experiences developmental changes of his own, he learns how to walk. In the end, Darvy teaches Molly an unexpected lesson.

| by Ward, Nanda

Tom lives far away from school and wishes he had a friend with whom to walk from school. He feels he has friends calling out to him when he echoes his names from on top of Hermit Mountain. Little did he know that a Hermit lived on the mountain and was disturbed by his echoes. Tom's echoes eventually lead to a friendship between the two.

| by Merriam, Eve

Harry is a daydreamer. Throughout his day, his dreams are interrupted consistantly by routine activities such as school, eating, playing, and reading. At the end of the day, Harry retires happily to his dreamworld.

| by Wahl, Jan

A woman daydreams of her future as she walks to the market. Her daydream proves to be too much of a distraction for her own good.
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