Browse Abstracts (239 total)

| by Hamanaka, Sheila

Emi and Martha go on a very long walk with Emi's dad. After many stops they reach Central Park, where Emi's dad makes them paper sail boats and hats. They are too tired to walk home so they take the bus. Emi's dad makes paper cranes for everyone.

| by Updike, John

Poems are provided with various pictures of objects which begin with each letter of the alphabet such as apple, bird, jam, egg, nickel, oatmeal, toy and zero.

| by Mitchell, Rita Phillips

Hue Boy is very concerned about his height. Everyone thinks that he is too short. He and his mother try every possible remedy, but nothing works. Finally, Hue Boy's father returns, and Hue Boy loses his feelings of smallness through his pride of being with his father.

| by Tarpley, Natasha Anatasia

Although she is often teased by her classmates about her Afro hair, Kenyana learns her hair makes her unique. Both her mother and teacher help show Kenyana why her hair is so special. Kenyana learns that it only matters what she thinks, not others.

| by Mendez, Phil

Jacob, a young African American boy, lives with his poverty striken family in the city. He dislikes his culture, life and heritage and is filled with hate. It takes some special magic to change his ideas.

| by Gray, Libba Moore

Elizabeth remembers a wonderful woman named Willie Rudd that had an extraordinary impact on her childhood. Elizabeth writes a letter to Willie Rudd to tell her that she loves her and apologizes for any wrongs committed due to Willie's race.

| by Adoff, Arnold

Growing up with a black mother and a white father can be hard on children. Adoff expresses how one family deals with this situation.

| by Greenfield, Eloise

A young African American boy describes all the activities that he and his father do.

| by Greenfield, Eloise

Three African American children show their friendship for one another in different ways as each child has different interests according to their age (A Board Book)

| by Ringgold, Faith

While Melody and her aunt's adopted son, Lonnie, are playing hide-and-seek, they stumble upon something magical. They discover that her aunt's paintings can speak. Each of the paintings is a portrait of a famous African-American woman, who tells Melody and Lonnie of their accomplishments.

| by Lester, Julius//Cepeda, Joe

God created the world with water, trees, land, animals, and people, and thought he had done a great job. God's angel Shaniqua told God that the world looked too boring. God then set out to make the world more interesting. First he made grass but that did not help much so God started singing and making beautiful music. When the flowers complained about being lonely, God called on Shaniqua to sing. Her voice was so pretty that the planets and starts started crying. The people on earth were very happy with their world and so was God.

| by Lexau, Joan M.

Benjie's granny loses her earring on the way home from church, so bashful Benjie sets out to look for it while his granny is takng a nap. He finds the earring, but in the process he loses his bashfulness.

| by Hausman, Bonnie

How are you feeling today?Join the children in this book to find out if they are feeling the same way. Learn the letters of the alphabet while you solve the puzzles of emotions. Have fun!

| by Polacco, Patricia

Larnel unexpectingly finds himself befriending an old, Polish woman. From Mrs. Katz, he learns Jewish history and begins to appreciate his own African roots.

| by Wyeth, Sharon Dennis

A little girl looks out her window only to see broken glass and trash in the court yard. She remembers her mother once told her everyone should have something beautiful. She sets out to look for something beautiful in her neighborhood.

| by Ormerod, Jan

Three families come together every day of the week to do activities help each other out. Some observe activities, do chores with others, or run errands with their friends. With so many people doing things together it is hard to keep track of who's whose!

| by Curtis, Gavin

Reginald loves playing the violin. His father only has time to worry about the Duke's losing streak. Reginald passionately plays the violin to improve the baseball team's losing streak. Find out what else Reginald's love for the violin improves.

| by Monjo, F.N.

Tom misbehaves in church and is sent home early. He goes to play in the barn and discovers runaway slaves. He and his father help them escape and Tom learns all about freedom through the Underground Railroad.

| by Burch, Robert

Joey's cat has kittens in the garage, but why won't Joey's parents let him go near them?He finally does get near them when Mama Cat's kittens are in danger from a opossum in the garage. Mama Cat then allows Joey to see the kittens.
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