Browse Abstracts (250 total)

| by Wrightson, Patricia

Two friends have good times and bad times. When they argue, they usually solve their problems. But have things gone too far this time?

| by Adelson, Leone

How do animals get ready for winter?Is it different from how children get ready for winter?

| by Seuss, Dr.

A grandfather tells his grandson about the bad habit of the Zook people. The Zooks eat their bread with the butter side down. The Zooks and Vooks are separated by a wall, and they always argue about the way things should be done.

| by Sis, Peter

Mary and her mother visit the beach. They see numbers, opposites, letters, and shapes. There are many fun things to do at the beach.

| by Brandenburg, Franz

Otto is sad because he is an octopus and has eight arms. He feels different from everyone else. He learns that eight arms are better than two and that it is okay to be different.

| by Baker, Barbara

Digby and Kate spend every day together. They play games, eat, draw pictures, take walks, and just enjoy each other's company. The only problem is that they often disagree, as a dog and cat should. Still they have fun together and continue to be best friends.

| by Cowen, Catherine

Even though this little girl thinks she is a wonderful piano player, mother insists on lessons. But the piano is friends with the young girl and wants her to continue playing her own music. To avoid being sold, they take off on an exciting adventure.

| by Kirk, David

Miss Spider is planning to have eight for tea. But what is she to do when the bugs are too scared to eat her cake?Ask Miss Spider how she makes friends with every moth, tick, and flea -- just by having cake and tea.

| by Adams, Adrienne

A small group of witches prepare for their favorite night of the year, Halloween. The witches become frightened of the children that are dressed up in costumes.

| by Bang, Molly

One day, a goose egg falls into the home of woodchucks and hatches open. A goose is raised by the woodchucks and becomes part of their family. Eventually, the goose feels very sad and doesn't know why. When she ventures out to find happiness, she accidentally learns to fly.

| by Testa, Maria

Rico, a boy with Downs Syndrome, overcomes many obstacles. See how he does it in three different stories.

| by McGinnis, Lila

In kindergarten, everyone talks about their daddies except Kate. She doesn't have a daddy in her life. Her mom explained that he moved away. Kate and her sister, Glory, are curious so one day they walk to his house. They meet him and his new baby, which he claims is his only one. They run all the way home to tell their mom. They talk about love and what it means.

| by Jewell, Nancy

The moon tells a story of a family. Each family member has a different perspective of the night.

| by Morey, Kathleen

In a rhyming text, Kathleen describes the many different ways in which people cry. She notes how her friends and parents show emotion.

| by Maclear, Kyo

Spork feels left out. He has a spoon and a fork for parents, which makes him unique compared to the other cutlery. He is never chosen in the kitchen, until something comes along that neither forks nor spoons can handle. His uniqueness comes in handy!

| by James, Betsy

Growing up is an exciting process, especially for Molly and her brother, Darvy. Molly discovers frog eggs while she is at the pond and is allowed to bring them home until they develop into frogs. While Darvy experiences developmental changes of his own, he learns how to walk. In the end, Darvy teaches Molly an unexpected lesson.

| by Jennings, Michael

Robin Goodfellow likes to get into mischief. One day he decides to play a trick on a slow-witted giant. The giant appears to be smaller and goes to others for advice and help.

| by Anno, Mitsumasa

The king believes he must have everything bigger and better than anyone else until he tries to grow the biggest flower. The little flower is so beautiful that the king realizes that bigger does not mean better.

| by Nye, Naomi Shihab

Mona's grandmother Sitti lives on the other side of the world. Even though they don't speak the same language, they find a way to communicate and become very good friends.

| by Townsend, Kenneth

Felix, the lion, is embarassed about his bald head and will do anything to cover it up, including stealing hats from people. When none of the hats work, Felix becomes discouraged. With the help of a friendly colonel, Felix becomes the talk of the town.
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