Browse Abstracts (54 total)

| by Waber, Bernard

Ira has to make a tough decision about a bear, and just does not know what to do. The sleep over proves to be stressful, but it finds a way to work itself out.

| by Hoagland Hunter, Sara

A young boy is insecure about moving away and leaving what is familiar to him. His grandfather tells about the time when he felt the same way and how he grew proud of his accomplishments.

| by Maguire, Arlene

Children of diverse backgrounds are shown and differences are emphasized. Every child has different interests and strengths and all characteristics should be valued. Everyone is special!

| by Munsch, Robert

Prince Ronald and Princess Elizabeth's castle is burned down by a dragon, who then steals the prince. Elizabeth chases after the dragon to free her prince.

| by Soto, Gary

Chato, the coolest low-riding cat in East L.A., feels very fortunate when he learns a family of mice accepts his invitation to dinner. Chato and his best friend, Novio Boy, prepare an extravagant meal excluding the main dish. When the two cats open the door and see a surprise guest, they realize that their plan is ruined.

| by Rylant, Cynthia

A scarecrow is more than just borrowed parts to make up a man. This scarecrow gets to see everything from vegetables growing to all the different animals that surround him. He sees how many of the simple things in life are the greatest.

| by Brown, Margaret Wise

Learn about all of the important things in early childhood from ages one through six. At one, you've found your nose and discovered your toes. By five and six, you've learned some tricks.

| by Updike, John

Poems are provided with various pictures of objects which begin with each letter of the alphabet such as apple, bird, jam, egg, nickel, oatmeal, toy and zero.

| by Mitchell, Rita Phillips

Hue Boy is very concerned about his height. Everyone thinks that he is too short. He and his mother try every possible remedy, but nothing works. Finally, Hue Boy's father returns, and Hue Boy loses his feelings of smallness through his pride of being with his father.

| by Lamstein, Sarah

Random acts of kindness are demonstrated by Cassandra as she tells her teacher that she likes her buttons. Cassandra's positive attitude spreads throughout her school and around the neighborhood bringing joy and surprise to all.

| by Nixon, Joan Lowery

Tom is adopted by Shirley and Claude, and he hopes that they will adopt his sister, Bessie. Bessie and Shirley make a great team of catching crooks. Bessie spots them, and Shirley stops them. Bessie makes a great deputy and new daughter.

| by Green, Mary McBurney

Four friends demonstrate how activities might be easy or hard depending on the person who performs them. Through physical activities, like jumping or skipping, these children promote emotional health by letting kids know it's okay if you are not good at everything.

| by Burleigh, Robert

It was clear at a young age that Babe Ruth was talented at baseball. This talent became even more amazing as he got older, when he wowed the stadium fans with his memorable home runs. These historic moments will be remembered in baseball forever.

| by Halliman, P.K.

A vision of harmony celebrates differences among people. These vibrant pictures and rhymes help portray the notion that uniqueness in individuals is what makes each of us so special.
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