Browse Abstracts (218 total)

| by Luttrell, Ida

Ottie said mean things to his neighbors all day. One day he builds a glass house which allows his neighbors to meddle in his life. He then decides to be nice to them.

| by Udry, Janice May

Laura Linda was not happy with anything she had. She wished she had a perfect little girl to play with in her tree house and yellow house next door. Finally, a little boy moved in next door and invited her to play in his treehouse if he could swing on her tree.

| by Nixon, Joan Lowery

Susan and Mike accompany their neighbors on Christmas Eve to find out if horses really talk at midnight. While in the barn, Susan and Mike hear a robbery take place and help to find the robbers and the money stash.

| by Gibbons, Gail

Everyone goes to Marge's Diner because it is open 24 hours a day. Marge feeds all kinds of people: truck drivers, families, travelers, school kids, businessmen, and telephone company workers. Everyone is friendly at the diner, and it is a big meeting place for friends.

| by Van Allsburg, Chris

Minna Shaw rescues a fallen witch and in return is given the witch's old broom. Neighbors think the broom is evil, but it helps the widow with her chores. The neightbors try to destroy the broom, which later comes back to haunt them.

| by Bonsall, Crosby

Homer starts to believe he is a pest because others say he is. When the others fall in a hole, Homer thinks of a way to get them out. After they are rescued, they never call Homer a pest again.

| by Wahl, Jan

Farmer Puckle owns a rooster who crows constantly. They try everything to get him to stop and finally discover a treasure to solve the problem.

| by Gibbons, Gail

Christmas is coming so everyone is busy making preparations on the island. On Christmas Eve, everyone gathers at church for a festive celebration.

| by Hoban, Lilliam

Arthur's determination to have the best birthday party and be the best all-around gymnast causes him to be inconsiderate of the feelings of his sister and friends. When Arthur forgets to be fair and have fun at the competition, his younger sister is quick to point out that each chimpanzee has his or her own special skill to be honored with a medal at the birthday competition.

| by Friedrich, Elizabeth

One summer, Leah's father gives her a pony which she grows to love dearly. When told the devastating news that her family is running out of money, Leah has to decide what she will sacrifice to help.

| by Glass, Andrew

Johnny Appleseed is one of America's favorite heroes. As he travels across the wilderness of a peaceful land, he meets people and leaves behind appleseeds.

| by Martin, Jacqueline Briggs

Sarah's best friend is her dog Patches. Patches dies in a barn fire and every night after the fire, Sarah has nightmares and wakes up calling for Patches. Sarah goes to her Grandparent's house hoping to cure her from her nightmares. To comfort Sarah, Grandmother gives Sarah her old pocket filled with herbs, scissors, and gold buttons and embroidered with the words no fear, to wear under her skirt. In the meantime Sarah befriends a stray one-eyed cat. Sarah is not cured alone by the pocket full of herbs and the cat's friendship. It is only after a mean neighbor's accident that Sarah becomes…

| by Kellogg, Steven

A group of children plant a pumpkin for Halloween in a neighbor's garden. All summer they care for the pumpkin, but certain events happen which prevents them from making it into a jack-o-lantern. How will the children solve the pumpkin problem?

| by Karm, Roberta

Jack, Constance, Mama, and Papa play a riddling game which helps them understand life on the frontier. Their riddles are about their log cabin, food, icehouse, candles, and baskets.

| by McCully, Emily Arnold

Based on real events, Maisie Ferris, a girl from the mid-1800s, and her family don't really fit in with their neighbors in the small town of Galesburg, Illinois with their new ideas. They take one of their American creations, popcorn, to England and impress everyone with their corn that turns to snow.

| by Whitcher, Susan

Sylvie is a little girl who believes that the moon is magic. Even after her parents try to explain how big and far away the moon is, Sylvie still believes that the moon fell behind the neighbor's lilac bush. Sylvie believes that she saves the moon.

| by Hughes, Shirley

More than twenty rhymes tell about the daily life and activities of a young girl named Annie Rose. The playful poems cover several topics including animals, people, seasons, routines and adventures that children love.

| by Zion, Gene

Harry doesn't like the lady next door because she sings very high and loud and it makes his ears hurt. Harry tries to have the lady sing lower and quieter.

| by Brooke, L. Leslie

Johnny Crow has a new garden of the local animals. They sang, dance, and have a party thanking Johnny Crow.

| by Davol, Margueritte W.

Sui-Jen, the dragon, is awakened and begins to destroy everything. Mi Fei is the only person brave and wise enough to put the dragon back to sleep. Mi Fei needs courage, heroism, and wisdom to save his village from the dragon.
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