Browse Abstracts (79 total)

| by Grossman, Virginia

Rabbits are shown in Native American tradition. Count to ten as the rabbits perform various rhyming activities. Includes a glossary on Native American customs.

| by Chanin, Michael

After the rain, Flower longs for a day when she will see the great chief. When she has to make a blanket for him, she doubts her weaving skills. With her grandmother's love and encouragement, Flower makes the blanket. Will the chief ever receive such a gift?

| by Bunting, Eve

A young Sioux is taught the way of life by his father. The young boy is too young to do many things, but one day he will be able to do what he is taught. When the seasons change, he makes another notch in his moonstick.

| by dePaola, Tomie

Where does popcorn come from?This book gives the history of popcorn along with some helpful hints for storing, preparing, and popping popcorn.

| by Baker, Betty

Three Fools (a fictional tribe invented by the Apache Indians) go looking for buffalo and see horses for the first time. Three of the Indians want a horse to help them become big, important men. Instead of becoming bigger men, they make bigger fools of themselves.

| by Morris, Ann

A rhyme about shoes from all over the world ranges from new shoes to work shoes, game shoes to fun shoes.

| by Weisman, Joan

Lottie moves from her Indian Pueblo village to the city. She misses her Pueblo life until she meets an old woman with whom she shares old Pueblo stories. A new friendship is made when they share their stories.

| by Piercy, Patricia A

An African American tells the story of the discovery of America from a different point of view. He brings new knowledge to an excited and interested elementary classroom while telling the historical story.

| by Benchley, Nathaniel

Small Wolf, a young Indian Boy, wants to become a man, so he goes off to the woods to hunt. While there, he finds white men who do not want to talk and they shoot at him. The tribe moves time and time again away from the white men, until there is no where else to move and their tribe dies out.

| by Yolen, Jane

A Taino boy tells his view of Columbus' landing. He doesn't like the pale men and how the islanders are treated. He speaks out against this but no one listens because he is young.

| by King, Elizabeth

Each year, Hatch, New Mexico, has a festival to celebrate being the chile pepper capital of the world. The history of chile peppers, the different types of chiles, the making of ristras (garlands of red chiles), and the Hatch Chile Festival are described.

| by Fowler, Allan

The many different ways corn can be used and prepared are discussed. Other topics include the history of corn and the way corn is grown.

| by Goble, Paul

Native American legends guide their people. The story of an iron horse proved to come true when the Native Americans witnessed a train crash. In an attempt to keep the white men from stealing more land, the Native Americans burned the objects from the train.

| by Dengler, Marianna

When growing up, Amanda loved her Grandfather and his stories. But now that Amanda is old, she feels lonely. One day at the park she befriends a lonely boy. She is able to give the boy something very special. Then he gives her something in return.

| by Lowell, Susan

Cousins of pigs (known as javelinas) attempt a daring rescue from the hungry coyote. The angry coyote huffs and puffs to blow the house down of the first and second javelinas--but not the third!The hungry coyote has a sizzling surprise in the adobe house where the three little javelinas live happily ever after.

| by James, Betsy

Susi and her family are in desperate need of rain to save their corn and land. If it does not rain soon Susi and her family will have to move to a different place. Susi runs away to a secluded place and prays to her mud family to bring rain to the canyon. Eventually, the rain does come bringing Susi back to the family that needs her most of all.

| by Seattle, Chief

A Squamish Indian chief describes his people's respect and love for the earth and also his concern for its destruction.

| by Balet, Jan

Joanjo is sick of life in his fishing village. He dreams of a life far away from the village. He awakens to realize that perhaps a fisherman's life is a good life after all.

| by James, Betsy

A young girl lives with her grandmother. When she goes to sleep at night, she dreams about going up and down the stairs of life.

| by Larrabee, Lisa

A Native American girl learns how to make baskets from an elderly woman. As she learns, she also discovers many things about her life and herself.
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