Browse Abstracts (401 total)

| by Meddaugh, Susan

Martha is not an ordinary dog. She learns to speak by eating alphabet soup. On her afternoon walk she discovers a new dog in the neighborhood who bullies everything he sees. Through the help of a parrot, Martha learns that kind words can have a large effect-even on a bully.

| by Steptoe, John

A young African American boy feels jealous and angry when his mother accepts a new babysitting job for a younger child. It is only until the boy moves away that he realizes how much fun he had with him.

| by Miles, Miska

Henry feels sad about the void left in his life after his dog, Old Tuck, passes away. When a stranger on a white horse with a brown dog comes into town, Henry wishes that he could have a new dog. The stranger allows Henry to have his brown dog, if he can find him, for the stranger has set the dog free. Henry searches desperately for the dog and finally finds it, naming it Young Tuck.

| by Barrett, Joyce Durham

Willie's friend, Jo-Jo, told him that hugging was silly. Willie enjoyed and missed being hugged, so every night he would sneak a hug from a bath towel. He realized that he needed someone to hug, so he decided to start hugging his family again.

| by Steen, Patti

No one will hug Elliot Dravitz, because he is a porcupine. He wants a hug more than anything and he tries really hard to get one. Finally he finds another porcupine who will hug him and he is happy.

| by Bemelmans, Ludwig

Madeline goes to a Gypsy circus and is led astray. The other school girls follow and they get wrapped up in the excitement that they forget about home and school. The girls return home at the end.

| by Bemelmans, Ludwig

Madeline is a spunky young girl with a zest for life. Madeline lives in a boarding house with eleven other girls. One night, Madeline gets sick and must have her appendix out. Everyone misses her so they visit her. The other girls see that she is treated royally and she is envied.

| by McPhail, David

Stanley leaves his comfortable country home in search of adventure and fortune. He meets characters who manipulate him and others who treat him will.

| by Blegvad, Lenore

A fearless little girl named Anna Banana has a very active imagination. Anna has a friend who is a small boy. Together they experience many exciting adventures. They both confront their fears and overcome them.

| by Brown, Palmer

There is a family of mice that live in an old grandfather's clock. One of the mice named Hickory decides that he wants to move out into the field. Hickory lives out there and makes friends with a grasshopper named Hop.

| by Eversole, Robyn Harbert

April has a very vivid imagination which turns her house into a magical house. April's sister does not believe in the magic and when she is around it disappears for April too. One day when Meredith is struggling with her dance steps, April helps her to see the magic.

| by Chorao, Kay

This book includes three short stories. It describes details of an important friendship between Oink and Pearl. They grow closer with every adventure they encounter together.

| by Helldorfer, M.C.

An orphan boy befriends Skinny Bones, the dog of a hot-tempered old lady named Granny Trick. Together the boy and the dog must not only out smart Granny, but even the devil himself!

| by Balian, Lorna

A town finds a baby girl that they decide to adopt. They name the baby Valentine. They think Valentine is a normal little girl, but she grows and grows into a giant. When she's older, no one wants to marry her until one day another giant wanders through town.

| by Graham, Bob

Max is the son of the legendary superheroes Captain Lightning and Madam Thunderbolt. His family has high expectations for him to follow in their footsteps and become a superhero too. Now he just needs to learn how to fly. After many persistent tries, Max still can't keep himself off the ground. His family is supportive and determined to get him to fly. Will this confidence be enough to help him fly like the birds?

| by De Veaux, Alexis

Sudan had unruly hair. Everyone made fun of him for it. He found a place to be himself with people who were like him. He began to appreciate his differences.

| by Samuels, Barbara

Faye tries to do things to make cool and confident Cindy Snappleby like her. However, Cindy begins making fun of Faye's little sister and she refuses to put up with it. She sees that family is more important.

| by McGinley, Phyllis

Annabelle and Lucy are best friends. Annabelle tells Lucy how awful boys are for all sorts of reasons, but she goes off with a boy at the end.

| by Robins, Joan

Addie is reluctant to befriend her new neighbor Max, expecially after they run into each other when riding bikes. Eventually Addie's mom sets up a luncheon between the two of them. Addie begins to like Max and they become friends.

| by Horvath, Betty

Charlie devotes every Saturday to playing baseball. This Saturday his cousin Josephine comes to visit and his mother insists that he entertain her.
In partnership with the Center for Digital Scholarship at Miami University Libraries
Powered by Omeka