Browse Abstracts (16 total)

| by Pallotta, Jerry

Meet Amaryllis to Zinnia and every flower in between. Learn the sequence of the alphabet from A to Z and new flowers too.

| by Mashiri, Pascal

During a time of famine, Matunje goes looking for food. He finds mangoes which fall into the water and are carried out to sea. Matunje follows and is led to the sea king who gives him a magical wooden spoon to feed his country.

| by Polette, Keith

A retelling of a traditional Asian tale in which a discontented stone-cutter is never satisfied with each wish that is granted him. Set in the desert Southwest.

| by Rawson, Katherine

Join the parrot as it goes through its daily routine of climbing, chewing, eating, bathing, and finally, snuggling down for the night after a long day of parrot fun. Did you know that a parrotï¾’s special feet allow it to climb curtains, bookshelves, and plants? And it's hooked beak lets the parrot chew all kinds of great food: seeds, nuts, chair legs, popsicles, sticks, and a telephone directory!

| by Tofts, Hannah

Young children will enjoy looking at fruit as you name them. Then you talk about them in your own language- a perfect book for sharing. Each page opens to an extended vocabulary about each fruit from whole strawberry with its stalk, its seeds, and sweet slices to a whole peach with its soft and fuzzy skin, pit, and slices. Which fruit do you like?

| by Manalang, Dan

What do a grumpy grape, a pompous pineapple, and a humble coconut have in common? The answer is revealed in this charming rhyme that addresses the sensitive subject of prejudice.

| by Child, Lauren

Lola's brother goes to very creative lengths to encourage Lola to eat a variety of vegetables. When Lola refuses to eat peas, Charlie calls peas greendropss from Greenland and she nibbles one or two and says quite tasty!

| by Royston, Angela

A highly informative text that provides information on the food pyramid. The book discusses all aspects of the food pyramid and using real photos of children eating each food group. The end of the book also provides fun facts, a glossary, more books to read and an index.

| by Fisher, Doris and Sneed, Dani

A sequel to One Odd Day, this time the young boy awakens to find that it is another strange day: everything is even! His mother has two heads, and a trip to the zoo is dealt with in an odd, but even-handed, manner.

| by Diouf, Sylviane

When Bintou, a little girl living in West Africa, finally gets her wish for braids, she discovers that what she dreamed for has been hers all along.

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

When Adaora's cousin promises to find a triangle for her, he doesn't realize just how difficult the task might be. As they search through their village, the cousins encounter a variety of other shapes - heart-shaped leaves, circular elephant drums, crescent-shaped plantains - everything but the shape they seek. Just when the children are too tired to look anymore, they find a perfect triangle...and a great surprise to go along with it!

| by Cumberbatch, Judy

Sarah's grandpa gives her a special shell and says if she listens carefully she can hear the sea, but all she hears are every day village noises.

| by Brownlie, Alison

Describes the West African culture of food, including the kinds of food grown and eaten, and various feast days like Ramadan, Easter, naming ceremonies, and yam festivals.

| by Rockwell, Lizzy

Using colorful pictures, the author describes what our bodies need to survive. This book demonstrates to children which foods they should eat to stay healthy as well as what each food provides for the body (i.e., protein, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals). The end also provides healthy recipes for children to try with adult supervision.

| by Zaslavsky, Claudia

This beautifully illustrated four color picture book takes children through the markets, showing traditional finger counting of various African people - the Maasai, the Kamba, and the Taita in Kenya, the Zulu of South Africa, and the Mende of Sierra Leone. This book examines the role that numbers play in creating a common language across cultural boundaries.
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