Browse Abstracts (20 total)

| by Burns, Marilyn

A triangle gets bored doing the same old thing every day. He decides to take up a different shape, so he visits the shapeshifter to add on a few more angles. After a life of being a quadrilateral, pentagon and hexagon, the shape returns to its old self of being a triangle.

| by DK Publishing

Do you wear a winter coat to the pool? No, you wear a winter coat in the snow! This book asks and answers silly yet important questions for children.

| by The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Children will love learning about shapes through works of art from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

| by Mkatshaw, Dumazile

Leo was in the class watching ants crawl on the wall when his teacher asked on what animal he would be doing his project. He could only think of ants, about which he knew nothing. Leo goes to the library looking for a book and causes a terrible mess. Leo must find his book about ants, but he doesnメt know what it would look like.

| by Seegar, Laura Vaccaro

Experience the many vibrant colors while becoming acquainted with some of lifeメs common objects. Animals such as elephants and flamingos, foods such as carrots and eggplants, as well as objects like the moon and sky are illustrated here. Read all about these things and experience the rainbow of colors.

| by Carter, Don

In the morning trucks, such as dump trucks, bulldozers, cement mixers, tow trucks, cranes, and rollers, go to work. Learn about types of machines, sizes, colors, and numbers. At night, the trucks are finished working for the day.

| by Cole, Joanna//Calmenson, Stephanie

Come learn the alphabet, match words with pictures, and tell silly stories. Bright, colorful pictures and clever rhymes help capture and hold your attention.

| by McMillan, Bruce

This mouth-watering introduction to the basic unit of money uses tempting jelly beans and a simple progression of coins.

| by Showers, Paul

Losing and growing teeth are events that all children experience as they grow up. Learning how this process occurs and learning about the functions of teeth can be interesting and fun.

| by McMillan, Bruce

Through the use of photographs, a little girl named Becca, displays opposites. For example, a full glass of milk and an empty glass of milk are opposites.

| by Schnur, Steven

The autumn season is described using the alphabet. From apple cider to weather, each letter of the alphabet describes what happens from September to December.

| by Pelletier, David

Come take a trip from A to Z. Each letter is drawn to represent a whole word. These wonderful pictures bring out each letter in its own way!

| by Pinnington, Andrea//Davies, Charlotte

The different types of hats, shoes, sportswear, underwear, dressing-up clothes, night clothes, cold-day clothes, and hot-day clothes are presented. For example, hot-day clothes include sunglasses, a skirt, a t-shirt, shorts, a swimsuit, a sun hat, and a sundress. Photographs of each article of clothing are provided.

| by Aylesworth, Jim

An old black fly bothers a crazy mixed-up family by flying around and interrupting every aspect of their lives. The fly progresses through the alphabet by landing first on an apple pie, a baby, cookies, then a dog.

| by Christelow, Eileen

Five little monkey experience the consequences of jumping on the bed because their mama called the doctor and the doctor said, No more monkeys jumping on the bed!

| by McMillan, Bruce

Using foods like muffins and pizza, two children divide up and share food in three quantities (one-half, one-third and one-fourth).

| by Anno, Mitsumasa

In this alphabet book, one page has the letter, and the corresponding page has a picture of something that begins with that letter.

| by Shannon, George

Join in and guess the product that will be made tomorrow from the clue given today. For example, A is for seed, tomorrow's apple.

| by Dahl, Michael

Learn to count by fives through artistic handprints made by children. Students use handprints to create leaves, butterflies, and turkeys, as well as other objects. Count along with the fingers from five to fifty. Dominoes at the bottom of each page show another way to count.

| by Dahl, Michael

Count by twos and see where your tracks take you. Can you follow the footprints in the snow?
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