Browse Abstracts (21 total)

| by Michels, Dia L.

Baby travels with her family to the Synagogue and learns and sees many things related to the Jewish religion and customs.

| by Hopkinson, Deborah

A boy watches in amazement as the Empire State Building is built. When the building is completed he goes to the top with his father to see all of the New York City.

| by Kay, Verla

Building a railroad takes a lot of work. Many people must be involved from the planners and politicians in the capital, to the Irishmen and Chinese men building the track out west. When it is finally finished, the track is a wonderful form of transportation.

| by Levine, Abby

A Jewish family shops, cooks, and prepares for Passover. The traditions and the meanings behind them are explained in a rhyme.

| by Keeler, Patricia//Leitao, Julio T.

Informative passages and lyrical verse explore the history and rhythmic qualities of traditional African dance as performed long ago and today.

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

Ekinadose wants his Uncle Osaere to get married - then he can go to a wedding. One day, he sees people welcomed into his grandfather's house. They've come to collect their bride - and Edinadose will be going, not just to one wedding ceremony, but two!

| by Brownlie, Alison

Describes the West African culture of food, including the kinds of food grown and eaten, and various feast days like Ramadan, Easter, naming ceremonies, and yam festivals.

| by Brodsky, Beverly

The buffalo was very important for the survival of Native Americans. Learn about the history and importance of the buffalo. Excerpts from Native American songs and many original paintings add an artistic dimension.

| by Onyefulu, Ifeoma

Amarlai has a new baby cousin and he can't wait for her to be given a name. A tradtional African name will tell people where she comes from and which child she is in the family.

| by Soto, Gary

A young girl, Maya, retells the events of a Mexican-American family wedding by looking back through the wedding photos. From the excitement of being a flower girl, to the ceremony itself, to the music and dancing afterwards, she recalls many happy memories.

| by Van Laan, Nancy

Little Maria learns all about La Boda, a mexican wedding, from her grandmother, in a bilingual manner. She becomes part of the celebration and is happy to learn about and be part of her first wedding.

| by Mathers, Petra

Lottie's new beach towel certainly comes in handy during her day with Herbie. They are just going on a picnic, but they run into many adventures on the way. From using the towel as a sail, to using it as a veil, both Lottie and Herbie are ingenious when it comes to solving problems.

| by Hobbs, Will

It is spring, and all the bears are out except one. Short Tail decides to go find the one they call the Great Bear. He quickly tries climbing the mountains and goes to sleep, where he often finds the Great One in his dream. The Great One is so impressed by Short Tail's respect, that he shares an important secret.

| by James, J. Alison

This true story tells the tale of a Japanese village defeating their enemy samurai. The villagers use their minds instead of weapons to scare the samurai. Wearing wild masks, setting fires on the beach, and playing the drums of Noto Hanto, kept the village safe.

| by Onyefuln, Ifeoma

Nneka and Chidi, two children of a Nigerian village, play a game called Colors. Chidi only likes the color blue, so Nneka shows him all the other colors in the village. She shows Chidi how beautiful and colorful their African lifestyle is. The colors yellow, pink, red, gold are seen, but Chidi only likes blue best of all!

| by Pyle, Howard

Bearskin, an infant son of a miller, is sent down the river by the king only to be found by a she-bear who raises him. As Bearskin gets older he goes out into the world to be with other people. He learns about a three-headed dragon who takes the princess. If anyone can kill the dragon, then they get to marry the princess. Will Bearskin be able to kill the dragon and win her heart?

| by Schroeder, Alan

Willie isn't a smart man, but he sure is strong. He decides to enter a contest to prove it. However, Delilah and her granny have to get him in shape first. Now Willie's reputation and Delilah's love depend on his winning the contest. Do you think he can do it?
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